Nicknamed the "Date of Infamy Speech," it is one of the most famous political speeches of the 20th century. The sound recording was made available by the National Archives of the United States. Start studying Day of Infamy Speech. It gives emotion to American citizens that it wasn’t expected, and it was done on purpose, against the United States. The speech analysis worksheet. Secretary of State Cordell Hull had recommended that the president devote more time to a fuller exposition of Japanese-American relations and the lengthy but unsuccessful effort to find a peaceful solution. What does “infamy” mean in the phrase, “ a date which will live in infamy”? But if “Infamy” isn’t notable for its eloquence, it’s still a fascinating speech.

He describes the date as “a date that will live in infamy.” (Chan, 2016) (Roosevelt, 1941) The word infamy not only suggests the severity of the attacks, but also the affect the attacks will have on the future of the country. For a copy of the film, please send your mailing address to Jeffrey.Urbin@nara.gov. The Infamy Speech was brief, running to just a little over seven minutes. 2. 1941 had two purposes. This was the opening line of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Infamy Speech… was given to a Joint Session of Congress on December 8, 1941 which was one day after the attack upon Pearl Harbor .

1. What did the Japanese ambassador do right after the attack? The Infamy Speech was a speech delivered by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt to a Joint Session of the U.S. Congress on December 8, 1941, one day after the Empire of Japan's attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and the Japanese declaration of war on the United States and the British Empire.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. 1 Personal background of the speaker. 3. “Yesterday, December 7, 1941 – a date that will live in infamy – the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan” (Eidenmuller, 2005, p. 1). The "Infamy Speech" ("a date which will live in infamy".) Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan. The speech that was held on December 8th. The very next day, Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the United States Congress with his memorable speech including “a date which will live in infamy.” Next, I would like to bring focus to the rhetorical aspect of the main purpose and the relevance of FDR’s captivating speech. How would you characterize President Roosevelt’s attitude toward the Japanese government based on this speech? This speech was made by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to a Joint Session of Congress at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, December 8, 1941, in Washington, D.C. Match the elements of analyzing a speech to the information about Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Day of Infamy” speech. In his speech, he said: "yesterday, December 7, 1941, a the date that will live in infamy, the United States has been deliberately attacked by the naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

4. What do you think was the purpose of President’s Roosevelt’s speech?

2 Historical context 3 Audience and purpose 4Historical impact A) On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked the US naval base at Pearl Harbor. In 1941, while Pearl Habor's base was in ruins, US President Franklin Roosevelt came to a declaration of war against Japan.

Procedure: Share with your students the complete re-mastered clip of the President’s Day of Infamy speech and a transcript of the speech.