A Streetcar Named Desire is actually realism of several different varieties. Like Blanche, the Chinese paper lantern is used to cover something that was not so appealing. Why don’t you decide? Mitch hangs up the lantern, and Blanche is able to maintain her pose of the naïve Southern belle with him, but it is only a façade. She had bought a little colored paper lantern to put it over the light bulb, so the room could get that mysterious touch that she wanted. Here I will focus on Blanche and detail her symbolic meanings. Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire,” paper lanterns, kitchen candles, and multicolored strobes reveal the various shades of reality surrounding Blanch DuBois. Blanche: “Because of my hard knocks my vanity’s been given. You’ve got to be soft and attractive. Stanley assures her that she left nothing here but the paper lantern which he tears off the light bulb and hands to Blanche.

In A Streetcar Named Desire, a Chinese paper lantern is used to symbolize a main character's own insecurities. All Characters Blanche DuBois Stanley Kowalski Stella Kowalski Harold Mitchell (Mitch) Symbols All Symbols The Streetcar Varsouviana Polka Bathing Paper Lantern and Paper Moon Alcohol and Drunkenness Shadows Upgrade to LitCharts A + Instant downloads of all 1297 LitChart PDFs (including A Streetcar Named Desire). "If I can turn the trick again" -- Blanche DuBois in "Streetcar" ... > Blanche DuBois in "A Streetcar Named Desire" says something like, "I ... to put on soft colors, the colors of butterfly wings, and put a-paper lantern over the light.It isn't enough to be soft. Blanche is lost, confused, conflicted, lashing out in sexual ways, and living in her own fantasies. When Blanche visits her sister, Stella, and Stanley Kowalski’s modest apartment in New Orleans, tension regarding her mental stability immediately emerges. ” (Blanche p. 55 scene 3).
The paper lantern over the light bulb represents Blanche ’s attempt to mask both her sordid past and her present appearance. And I – I’m fading now! Blanche: “I never was hard or self-sufficient enough. It isn’t enough to be soft. ? Blanche DuBois is an uber-tragic figure.

Blanche as an example; it might be a conventional object or device – the naked bulb, paper lantern, and the color – that becomes symbolic of meanings within and without the play. When people are soft – soft people have got to shimmer and glow – they’ve got to put on soft colors, the colors of butterfly wings, and put a – paper lantern over the light…. Some would see the paper lantern as just a prop in this play but it is actually a reflection of how Blanche, the haughty and mysterious sister, really feels on the inside. It isn’t enough to be soft. The timeline below shows where the character Blanche DuBois appears in A Streetcar Named Desire. A Streetcar Named Desire – Motif Tracking: Colour . First you’ve got Magical Realism , which is a generally realistic setting with some odd fantasy thrown in. LitCharts Teacher Editions. After Stanley has dug up dirt on Blanche, he gives a big speech, which seems to include exaggerations (therefore, deciphering which points are accurate is difficult to determine). When people are soft—soft people have got to shimmer and glow—they’ve got to put on soft colors, the colors of butterfly wings, and put a—paper lantern over the light” (scene five). The lantern diffuses the stark light, but it’s only a temporary solution that can be ripped off at any moment. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance. After more conversation, Blanche explains how she tried to teach English and an appreciation for literature to youngsters who were not interested in it. Soft people have got to shimmer and glow- they’ve got to put on soft colors, the colors of butterfly wings, and put a paper lantern over the light? Blanche asks Mitch to cover the light bulb with a paper lantern because she can't "stand a naked light bulb, any more than a rude remark or a vulgar action." Blanche uses the lantern as a means to characterize herself: “I never was hard or self-sufficient enough. Here are the hints: 1. Blanche’s flaw is further brought out through Williams’ use of symbolism, both through the “the light bulb” and “the adorable coloured paper lantern”.